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PRESIDENT $ REPORT 2009

CHALLENGE PRECONCEPTIONS, ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING AND TRANSFORM OUR PLANET

... ONE PERSON AT A TIME.

When 44000 students a year choose to entrust their future to you, you have to live up

to their expectations. That’s what our faculty and staff do every day. We make it a point of pride to facilitate the accomplishments of our students; to provide them with opportuni-

ties for discovery and success. From the earliest days of our founding institutions Loyola College (1896) and Sir George Williams University (1926) —helping our students engage in learning has been at the core of our mission. Concordia embodies innovative teaching, real- world research and a commitment to social responsibility. It is an inclusive community where equality, non-discrimination and diversity are celebrated and actively promoted. Our vibrant, multicultural downtown and west-end campuses both reflect and contribute to the unique- ness of Montreal, one of the world’s most exciting, cosmopolitan cities. In fact, Concordia is a reflection of the world. International students account for 11% of our student population and represent more than 150 countries. The university has established formal links with more than

100 institutions in 33 countries on five continents.

Dedicated to academic excellence, a stimulating student experience and community involvement, Concordia prepares its graduates to live as informed, forward-thinking and engaged citizens committed to the spirit of enquiry. We offer more than 300 undergraduate and 200 graduate programs, diplomas and certificates through four Faculties, a School of Graduate Studies and a School of Extended Learning. Our research profile is growing and promotes cross-discipline approaches to some of the most pressing environmental, economic,

technological, social and creative challenges that society faces today.

Cover: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or baker’s yeast as it is commonly known, is used in the production of bioethanol today. At the Centre for Structural and Functional Genomics professor Vincent Martin and his team are modifying this yeast to develop more sustainable technologies to synthesize the next generation of biofuels and other important chemical compounds. See p. 20.

WHO WE ARE

Concordia University is welcoming, engaged and committed to innovation and excellence in education, research, creative activity and community partnerships. It dares to be different and

draws on its diversity to transform the individual, strengthen society and enrich the world.

WHAT WE ASPIRE TO BE

Concordia’s vision is to rank among Canada’s top five comprehensive universities within the next decade, and to be a first choice for students and faculty locally, across Canada, and

internationally in a wide variety of defined areas of research and study.

WHAT DRIVES US

Concordia’s core values stem from those long prized by its founding institutions. Concordia has adopted the motto of the city of Montreal, Concordia salus, which speaks to well-being through harmony. The union of two very different institutions of higher education has led to

an exceptionally successful synthesis of compatible and timely values.

EXCELLENCE Concordia values the curiosity and engagement of its faculty, staff, and students. Curiosity about the world around us, respectful engagement with those who inhabit it, and strong determination to improve it lead to productive exploration of current understandings, a rich spectrum of creative activity and practice, and the creation and

dissemination of new knowledge.

OPPORTUNITY Concordia values the openness and respect necessary to provide opportunities to a highly diverse student and faculty population. Here, diversity is interpreted broadly: for example, in addition to embracing diversity in ethnicity, gender, language, and accessibility, the university provides students with different and original ways of exploring their interests. Enabling faculty, staff and students to make a progressive impact on their world in

ways that respect and engage the uniqueness of each individual is a hallmark of Concordia.

QUALITY OF LIFE Concordia values a secure and respectful learning environment and workplace. We are committed to promoting a healthy, safe and sustainable campus and to

enhancing the quality of life of the community in which we live.

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Concordia University is increasingly recognized as an innovative teaching and research institution. As one of Canada’s most dynamic comprehensive universities, we approach societal

issues from a broad perspective and encourage our students to become active, critical and

concerned citizens.

We call this approach “big thinking”— examining the issues of the day and seizing opportunities

with a diversity of thought and an openness of spirit.

Concordia is breaking new ground in several important areas: energy, climate change, sustainability, cell and molecular biology, human rights, health and well-being, communications and the digital arts. The governments of Canada and Quebec acknowledged our leadership by awarding us nearly $80 million under the

Knowledge Infrastructure Program to build new state-of-the-art facilities.

We are united around a common vision for the future, set out in Reaching Up, Reaching Out—A Strategic Framework for Concordia University 2009-2014. We have identified priorities and initiated cross- university projects based on our three strategic goals: academic work of the highest quality; outstanding student experience and student

engagement; and community engagement and social responsibility.

We invite you to follow the Concordia story as we challenge preconceptions, advance understanding and transform our planet...

one person ata time.

President and Vice-Chancellor

PAUL SHRIVASTAVA eeieses tain odey

business world, there is a new bottom line. It’s about getting the job done while taking the long

view on resource allocation, social and environmental costs and improved efficiency.

Shrivastava is the Director of the David O’Brien Centre for Sustainable Enterprise at the John Molson School of Business. The Centre is named for Concordia’s Chancellor, David O’Brien,

who established it with a $2 million donation.

With the Centre, Shrivastava hopes to develop an interdisciplinary, cross-Faculty research agenda and programs on sustainable enterprise. He believes it is critical to involve economists, sociologists, political scientists, sustainability specialists as well as artists and designers in developing sustainable solutions. The knowledge that is gathered, examined, and developed at the Centre will be transferred to the business community. He is also keen on engaging Concordia students and staff in the O’Brien Centre’s research, as well as community members and corporations

in Montreal, and sustainability scholars from surrounding areas.

Most importantly, the next generation of business leaders is being trained to embrace an approach that benefits society from a perspective that

encompasses corporate, social and environmental concerns.

Led by Dean Sanjay Sharma, whose own research focus includes corporate environmental strategy and corporate sustainability, the John Molson School of Business is focused on educating responsible

business leaders and global citizens to manage in future business environments that are global,

complex, and sustainable.

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\ BUSINESSES CAN DEVELOP A VCOMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE AND BECOME MORE PROFITABLE BY BEING MORE SOCIALLY AND ECOLOGICALLY EFFICIENT.

: Paul Shrivastava, Director, David O’Brien Centre for Sustainable Enterprise

ANI STORY (GHANGE OUR BV Assy,

TERACIES OF -THE 27 2 CEN TORY.

Elizabeth Miller, Assistant Professor, Communication Studies

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powerful way to connect people. She uses video and digital media to give voice to those whose narratives need to be heard. Her award-winning documentary The Water Front examined public vs. private access to water and she addressed domestic violence and rights of women in

Novela, Novela; a film now integrated in social science curricula across the Americas.

A professor in communication studies, Miller guides her students to confront difficult issues such as the impact of social and economic power imbalances or the international politics of food. She also worked with her students to train activists from around the globe at the Video Advocacy Institute under the auspices of Witness, an international organization dedicated to using video to

address human rights violations.

As one of an interdisciplinary team of researchers, she is working with the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling on the Community-University Research Alliance Project: Life Stories of Montrealers Displaced by War, Genocide and Other Human Rights Violations. She is also the principal investigator on Mapping Memories. Through this project, Miller is teaching Montreal’s refugee youth peer interviewing, mapping and video production so

they can testify to their own experiences.

Developing the technology of storytelling and sharing those skills with communities that might otherwise remain silent are among the ways Concordia professors and students are building an international culture of connectivity. Across the university, projects like these are linking academia and the wider public, and

building bridges between communities and between

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He’s the co-primary investigator at Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), a network of academics, artists and technology developers who are using desktop virtual reality and videogame software to assist Aboriginal communities in

preserving, interpreting and communicating cultural histories.

At Kahnawake’s Survival School, Lewis encouraged students to share stories they had been told in their community. He and his team then taught them how to transform the tales into

virtual environments with Aboriginal protagonists.

Lewis’ research studio, Obx Labs, is housed in Hexagram-Concordia, in Concordia’s Faculty of Fine Arts. The Hexagram Institute for Research/Creation in Media Arts and Technology is recognized internationally in areas where Quebec

is emerging as a world leader including responsive textiles and wearable computing, interactive environments and performance, virtual heritage, high

definition cinema and interactive game design.

On another front, the Concordia Digital History Lab in the Faculty of Arts

& Science is using new media to develop ways to share the task of historical research and interpretation with online audiences worldwide— scholars, students, and the general public. Projects have touched on digitizing the last remnants of unique and ephemeral documents about labour organizations in South Africa during the 1920's, 1930's and 1940's and providing an image- and-sound journey through the more than 400-year memory of

the Acadians, the French-speakers of Atlantic Canada.

With creative use of new technologies, we're better understanding our pasts

and moving into the future.

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INDIVIDUALLY AND CULTURALLY.

—Jason Lewis, Assistant Professor, Computation Arts

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LILIANE CHAMAS, concortie's nes

Rhodes Scholar, is not one to shy away fron hallenge. The Oxford-bound graduate will

earn her PhD in clinical medicine, and eventually work to improve diabetes treatment in the

developing world.

As an undergraduate honours student in cellular molecular biology, she completed her research on obesity and diabetes at Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, surrounded by graduate students, as well as post-doctoral and professional researchers. She added Spanish as her fifth language while participating in a project in Mexico on sexual reward and reproductive success. The work was related to research on sexual behaviour in

Jim Pfaus’ psychology lab.

Like many other Concordia students, Chamas credits the chance to participate in research both on campus and internationally, the supportive, intimate environment of Concordia’s colleges and schools, and the encouragement of

her professors with helping her to reach her goals.

Learning beyond the classroom, whether through international volunteer

programs or co-op work terms, is a hallmark of our university.

Through a series of partnerships established with educational institutions around the world, over 400 students are able to study abroad every

year, earning credit towards their degree.

Through a personalized academic approach and opportunities for real-world research and social engagement, Concordia is opening the

classroom to the world.

AM O’BRIEN L O believes there is a point at which power

will shift; when alternative energy will become the standard. He thinks this time has come.

As a PhD student in Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, O’Brien is participating in

an industry-leading initiative to develop viable net-zero solar houses—a structure equipped ae me q

to produce as much energy as it uses.

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O’Brien is part of the Concordia-based Solar Buildings Research Network, a collaboration of crane

24 researchers from ten Canadian universities centered at Concordia. Through the network, i

Concordia has developed and integrated a 300 sq m photovoltaic/thermal solar panel system

into the new MB Building, home of Concordia’s John Molson School of Business. The panels generate up to 25 kW of electricity and 75 kW of heat: enough energy to turn on 1250 CFL bulbs, and provide heat for seven Canadian homes throughout the year. This is a world first for an office building. The MB Building qualifies for the prestigious LEED

(Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver Certification.

The network’s next challenge will be to further study how building materials perform in relation to simulated heat, frost, light, wind and condensation. They will test for these factors in an environmental chamber built with a $4.5 million grant from the Knowledge

Infrastructure Program.

Resourceful thinking is leading us to create a wealth of technology that will diminish society’s dependence on fossil fuels. Our engineering professors are developing solar-powered charge stations for electric vehicles, equipment to convert solid waste into methane as an alternative to natural gas, and small-scale wind turbines that will generate household energy in an

urban environment.

This is how we're ensuring the future of clean energy.

it

: =—Liam O'Brien, PhD Student, Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering

INSTEAD OF A FORMALIZED SEPARATION WE NEED PERMEABLE BOUNDARIES BETWEEN THE UNINECERAANN PIE ROOM VICN ER Agee AND IDEAS SHOULD MOVE BACK AND FORTHS) Elizabeth Hunt, Coordinator, University of the Streets Café .

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the ivory tower to come tumbling down. As coordinator of the University of the Streets Café, she brings people together in informal venues like cafés, art galleries and parks to engage in public conversations. The result is exchange between experts, students, citizens and passers-by

on everything from politics to the environment, and from history to health. Seven years and

nearly 325 conversations later, this program continues to take education outside the university.

This spirit of inclusive public education has been part of Concordia’s DNA since our beginnings. We continue to believe that the knowledge, information and programs developed

in our classrooms and laboratories should be accessible to the broadest number of people.

Our libraries, cultural and varsity activities, lecture and film series and special events held in our multiple galleries, concert hall and theatres are open to the public and

we encourage Montrealers to benefit from our vibrant campus life.

Four out of every ten faculty members are part-time, many of them with active careers in business, the community or the arts in addition to their

teaching responsibilities. Each of them brings a wealth ay eS

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of experience and real-life examples from their own practice into

the classroom.

Through eConcordia, online educational services are available to growing numbers of people. Credit and professional development courses in business, engineering, arts and science allow students to

study from anywhere, on their own schedules.

Developing ways for knowledge to move across time, across space, and between the institution and the

community remains a Concordia priority.

TOTAL STUDENT ENROLMENT

43 942

ENROLMENT BY LEVEL

TOTAL

39 904

UNDERGRADUATE 33571 (76.4%) FULL TIME: 21221 PART TIME: 12350

GRADUATE 6333 (14.4%) FULL TIME: 4 633 PART TIME: 1 700

CONTINUING EDUCATION 4038 (9.2%)

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ENROLMENT

TOTAL

4439

ENCS 1240 (27.9%)

ARTS & SCIENCE 1161 (26.2%) JOHN MOLSON 994 (22.4%) FINE ARTS 230 (5.2%) VISITING 133 (3.0%) INDEPENDENT 681 (15.3%)

ENROLMENT IN CREDITED COURSES: 39 904 ENROLMENT IN CONTINUING EDUCATION: 4 038

ENROLMENT BY FACULTY

TOTAL

39 904

ARTS & SCIENCE 17 030 (42.7%) UNDERGRADUATE: 15 023 GRADUATE: 2.007

JOHN MOLSON 8026 (20.1%) UNDERGRADUATE: 6 803 GRADUATE: 1196

ENCS 5690 (14.3%) UNDERGRADUATE: 3 514 GRADUATE: 2176

FINE ARTS 3482 (8.7%) UNDERGRADUATE: 2991 GRADUATE: 491

INDEPENDENT & VISITING 5676 (14.2%) UNDERGRADUATE: 5 213 GRADUATE: 463

TOTAL ALUMNI

154 000+

TOTAL PERSONNEL

6515

PERSONNEL BY CATEGORY

2008/09

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PERSONNEL

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TEACHING ASSISTANTS 1065

RESEARCH (NON-PERMANENT) 740 CONTINUING EDUCATION PROFESSORS 100 PART-TIME PROFESSORS 673

FULL-TIME PROFESSORS 910 PROFESSIONAL LIBRARIANS 40 |

ADMINISTRATIVE & SUPPORT (HOURLY/NON-PERMANENT) = 1 202

ADMINISTRATIVE & SUPPORT (NON-PERMANENT)

ADMINISTRATIVE & SUPPORT (PERMANENT)

14A72

STUDENT ATHLETES AND THE BROADER COMMUNITY EXTENDED THEIR SEASONS with the construction of the Sports Dome, an inflated cover allowing year-round access to the athletic fields on our Loyola campus. It is a first for the Quebec university network. The sustainably-designed

air-inflated structure enables all-season use of the equivalent of four sports fields.

CONCORDIA AND THE CITY OF MONTREAL MARKED THE 70TH ANNIVERSARY

OF THE PASSING OF NORMAN BETHUNE witha special ceremony involving leaders of the Chinese community. It ended with a wreath ceremony at Bethune’s statue which stands in a park at the heart of Quartier Concordia. The series of events and exhibitions held across the city included the launch of Adrienne

Clarkson's biography of the physician and humanitarian who personified many of the university’s core values.

CONCORDIA'S GENOMICS EXPERTISE IN CONVERTING PLANT-BASED WASTE {NTO FUEL has been recognized by a range of public and private funding sources. Biology professor Adrian Tsang will lead a $17.5 million dollar research program, the largest in environmental genetics ever funded in Genome Canada’s history. The project will advance research on deploying fungal enzymes to break down biomass for conversion into fuels. Meanwhile, biology professor Vincent Martin is co-lead on a project classifying the genes in plants that contribute to the synthesis of novel high-value plant-derived bioproducts. This project was awarded $13.6 million, from the Genome Canada Applied Genomics Research in Bioproducts or Crops (ABC) competition, with more than $4.6 million for Martin’s activities at Concordia. The research teams will be housed in a brand new state-of-the-art building on the Loyola Campus to be

constructed with over $30 million allocated by the Knowledge Infrastructure Program.

CONCORDIA HAS GIVEN THE CANADIAN AND AMERICAN GOVERNMENTS A BLUEPRINT for policy and decision-making intended to prevent future genocides around the world.

The university’s Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies Will to Intervene includes 80 recommendations addressing a range of government practices and powers and offers a toolkit for creating enduring change. Led by MIGS Director Frank Chalk and Senior Fellow and Senator LGen (ret’d) Roméo Dallaire, the report has been listed by the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University as an

official resource for their Mass Atrocity Response Operations project.

JMSB STUDENTS PROVED THEY CAN MANAGE EVENTS, AND WIN THEM. Besides organizing two successful case competitions at the graduate and undergraduate levels that welcomed

teams from around the world, the John Molson School of Business’ students excelled in competitions elsewhere. They kicked off the year with gold at the 2009 Financial Open in Quebec City. The next month, the MBA students earned gold at the George Washington University School of Business International Case Competition. Meanwhile, the undergrads were the clear winners in the Caisse de dépdt et placement du Québec’s 12th Simulation boursiére interuniversitaire de la SRA HEC Montréal. The next week, they earned their fourth straight victory at HEC Montréal’s 17th edition of Marketing Happening. In November, students demonstrated the JMSB’s growing emphasis on sustainable business practices, by winning the TATA Cup

Sustainability Case Competition hosted by the Telfer School of Management at the University of Ottawa.

STUDENTS AND FACULTY WILL ADVANCE RESEARCH IN BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE AND CLINICAL EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY with the construction of the PERFORM (Prevention, Evaluation, Rehabilitation, Formation) centre. The $35 million facility, supported by the Knowledge Infrastructure Program, will strengthen ties with hospitals and health centres, locally and internationally. Once in operation, therapeutic facilities for people with sport injuries or chronic health problems such

as cancer, cardiac or respiratory diseases will be available to the wider community.

in the sixth annual Knights School Survey. Among the 35 MBA programs evaluated in Corporate Knights Magazine, Concordia has remained number one provincially since the survey’s inception in 2004. Meanwhile, the Aspen Institute has ranked the school third in Canada in “Beyond Grey Pinstripes,”

their biennial, alternative university ranking.

along with their predecessors at Loyola College and Sir George Williams University are now a mouse-click away with the launch of Spectrum, a Concordia-designed institutional repository. This is the first step in making researchers’ peer-reviewed research and creation output accessible to everyone with an

internet connection.

N \, the urban landscape surrounding our downtown Sir George Williams Campus. Residents were invited to tour the Grey Nuns Mother House to learn about the heritage site and our plans for its future use as the home of the Faculty of Fine Arts. In the Fall, Concordia hosted hundreds of international scholars at a conference on repurposing religious sites and took the opportunity to open an exhibit revisiting the Mother House through the eyes of several Concordia artists at the FOFA Gallery. The university coordinated a targeted mailing to 45,000 neighbourhood households bordering our two campuses inviting them to take advantage of a range of screenings, lectures, events and exhibits

available to them in their own backyards.

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NCO} |IA’S BAS} BA TEAM WON THE PROVIN \ HAM! | for the third time in the last five years. The women's rugby team also earned first place provincially, and then took fourth in the nationals. Meanwhile, the Concordia baseball team won three consecutive games on the

last day of competition to claim the Canadian Intercollegiate Baseball Association national crown.

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WITH THE SUPPORT AND ENCOURAGEMENT OF THE PROVINCE’S WELL ESTABLISHED IRISH COMMUNITY, the university opened the School of Canadian Irish Studies. The school owes its existence to the 600 community donors who offered resources and support to the project. The program boasts two research chairs, funds for visiting scholars and 23 scholarships. The program now

offers courses in 12 departments across the Faculties of Arts and Science and Fine Arts.

JMSB STUDENTS SEEKING A MAJOR IN ACCOUNTANCY in the Bachelor of Commerce Program will no longer have to write the first of two exams to qualify for accreditation. The Certified Management Accountants (CMA) of Canada determined that the program fulfilled the expectations of the first part of their rigorous qualification exam. Now students need only focus on the second half of the

qualifying test.

STUDENTS CAN NOW IMPROVE THEIR STUDY SKILLS AND PREPARE FOR ADMISSION TO CONCORDIA with a variety of complementary credit courses available through the School of Extended Learning. The four-credit Skills for Success in University Study course is designed as an introduction to the critical elements needed for success in courses at the university such as general study skills, motivation and writing skills as well as information literacy. Among others, there are also two courses on Problem-based Service Learning (a student-centered approach to learning that addresses real world problems): one offering a theoretical overview, the other a supervised community placement of 120 hours

over the semester.

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ENGINEERING STUDENTS CONSTRUCTED A 40-FOOT SCALE REPLICA OF THE EIFFEL TOWER using 55000 pieces of K’Nex—the locally produced building toy. The Engineering Week

accomplishment earned them the awe of their peers and a spot on Daily Planet on the Discovery Network.

HEXAGRAM-CONCORDIA OPENED THE DOORS TO TWO NEW LABS FOR EXPERIMENTS IN PERFORMANCE, SOUND AND NEW MEDIA. Both labs are headed by Canada Research Chairs. Composer, theatre director and concept artist Sandeep Bhagwati’s Matrabox is an 800 sq ft performance space wired with theatre lighting, three-channel video projection and comprehensive equipment for video and audio production. It accommodates musical, dance, theatre, cinematic and

studio art performances. Sha Xin Wei, who holds a joint appointment in the Faculties of Fine Arts and Engineering & Computer Science, is responsible for the Topological Media Lab. It unites researchers from anthropological, literary, architectural, studio art and computer science backgrounds to study the meaning of performance and build events that have cultural value. The lab created Ozone, a responsive sound and music instrument with an elastic screen equipped with microphones and sensors to interpret movement as

sound and video.

PERFORMING ARTS STUDENTS AT LOYOLA WERE KEPT ON THE MOVE THROUGH 2009. In April they participated in City of Wine, a national theatre event involving 150 students and educators from seven theatre schools. Then, in the summer, they moved to expressly designed facilities on the Sir George Williams Campus. The new studios, rehearsal spaces and workshops can accommodate multi- media exploration for the theatre, dance and music departments with the support of $11 million from the

Knowledge Infrastructure Program.

24

|

RESEARCHERS FROM A BROAD RANGE OF DISCIPLINES ARE ADDRESSING THE IMPACT AND IMPORTANCE OF GAMING CULTURE. The brand new Technoculture, Art and Games (TAG) research group explores the sociology of gaming culture, the potential impact of video games as learning tools for history or language and the technology of game design and interface. TAG is

contributing to Quebec’s reputation as a leading centre for digital media, an exploding field worldwide.

STUDENTS SET ASIDE THEIR BOOKS SEVERAL TIMES OVER THE YEAR TO HELP THOSE LESS FORTUNATE. In January, two students lived in the Webster Library for ten days to raise over $1 300 as part of the Live-in for Literacy. The funds they raised helped establish libraries in nine communities in India. Meanwhile, JMSB students camped out in front of the GM building through five frosty March nights to raise money for Dans la rue. Five Days for the Homeless raised over $30,000 in its sophomore year. By June, students were in gear with the annual Colors of Concordia fundraiser at the 52 km Tour de ’ile cycling event. Over $5 000 was raised by the largest contingent in the event’s history to

promote cultural exchange and diversity.

STUDENTS COMPLETING A GRADUATE DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE IN THE FACULTY OF FINE ARTS are now eligible for one of two Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Family Foundation fellowships in the visual arts. The Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art, to

be inaugurated in Spring 2010, will be awarded annually to support exceptional students beginning their

artistic careers.

: oe

2008/09

FACULTY

SIMA APRAHAMIAN,

Sociology and Anthropology

Honoured at International Women’s Day celebrations organized by the

Montreal and Laval chapters of the Armenian Relief Society (ARS-HOM)

ANDREAS ATHIENITIS,

Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering Appointed contributing author on direct solar energy by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

GARY BOYD, Education Canadian Network for Innovation in Education Leadership award

GENEVIEVE CADIEUX, Studio Arts Unveiled her 50-foot artwork Lierre sur Pierre on new MB building

DAN CROSS, Film Studies

Edward Jones Audience Choice Award

at the 47" Ann Arbor Film Festival for his role as producer of RiP: A remix manifesto; part of diplomatic mission of Governor General of Canada Michaelle Jean to Norway and Ukraine

MARK A. ELLENBOGEN, Psychology Reconfirmed as the Canada

Research Chair in Developmental Psychopathology

HAROLD ENTWISTLE,

Distinguished Professor Emeritus

Honoured by the Canadian Society for Study in Education for his contributions to the discipline of education

ARP| HAMALIAN, Education Honoured as one of 11 YWCA 2009 Women of Distinction, receiving the Education Award

AMIN HAMMAD,

Institute for Information Systems Engineering Named Fulbright Visiting Chair in Transborder Studies at Arizona State University

WALAA HAMOUDA, Electrical and Computer Engineering (with master’s student Abou Saleh) Best Paper Award at the IEEE International Conference on Communications

VAN SUONG HOA,

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Association de la recherche industrielle du Québec Partenariat Technologique Prize

CHRISTOPHER JACKSON, Music Elected into the Royal Society of Canada (RSC)

RABBI HOWARD JOSEPH, Religion Received honorary doctorate from New York’s Yeshiva University

MUTHUKUMARAN PACKIRISAMY, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Elected Fellow of the Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineering

JIM PFAUS, Psychology

Frank A. Beach Award in comparative psychology from Division 6 of the American Psychological Association

ADAM RADOMSKY, Psychology Distinguished Contributions to

the Public or Community Award from the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA)

RONALD RUDIN, History Elected into the Royal Society of Canada (RSC)

ANDREW RYDER, Psychology 2009 Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) President’s New Researcher Award

SHERRY SIMON,

Département d’études frangaises Killam Research Fellowship from the Canada Council for the Arts

TED STATHOPOULOS,

Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering 2009 Jack E. Cermak Medal of the Engineering Mechanics Institute of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)

JANE STEWART,

Distinguished Professor Emeritus,

Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology 2009 John B. Stirling Montreal Medal from Queen’s University

FRANCOISE SULLIVAN, Studio Arts Elevated to the rank of Officer within the Order of Canada

M.N.S. SWAMY,

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Named Honorary Professor by the National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), Taiwan

GABOR SZILASI, Photography (retired) 2009 Prix Paul-Emile-Borduas

YONG ZENG

Institute for Information Systems Engineering Reconfirmed as the Canada Research Chair in Design Science

STUDENTS

SIENA ANSTIS,

Journalism and Sociology undergraduate 2009 Forces Avenir Undergraduate Personality award

SARAH BENNING,

Biology undergraduate

Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation award at the Institute of Mental Health Research Young Researchers’ Conference

DIEGO CUETO, JMSB PhD student Joe Kelly Graduate Award

JOANNE HUI, Humanities PhD student For her artwork, The Potato Wars: Chinese- Canadian Resistance during the Exclusion Era, included in the Rideau Hall exhibition DIASPORArt; Strategy and Seduction by Canadian Artists from Culturally Diverse Communities.

JILLIAN KESTLER-D’AMOURS, Journalism undergraduate Hong Kong Student Fellowship

WEI LIU, Design Science PhD student Best Paper Award at the 16” International Society for Productivity Enhancement (ISPE) International Conference on Concurrent Engineering

HASSAN ABOU SALEH,

Electrical and Computer Engineering Master’s student (with professor Walaa Hamouda) Best Paper Award at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) International Conference on Communications

FITSUM TARIKU, ENCS PhD graduate 2009 Housing Studies Achievement Award from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

AHMAD ZBEEB,

Electrical and Computer Engineering student (with professor Abdel Sebak)

Best student paper (Energy) at the International Conference on Energy & Environment (EnviroEnergy)

ANDREW DI LULLO, SCHEALE DUVAH PENTIAH & AMIR AOUEISS, Industrial Engineering undergraduates

First place in the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) Quebec Simulation Competition

ANDREA CLARK,

Cell and Molecular undergraduate

MYTSUMI LOUIS-FOSTER,

Behavioral Neuroscience undergraduate PETER QUASHIE, Biology Masters student Scholarships from the Quebec Black Medical Association

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Whose work in developing Concordia’s rigorous environmental policy have helped the school win this year’s Prix québécois d'entreprise citoyenne in the category of environment, large institutions.

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REVENUES 2008009

OPERATING FUND 2009

TOTAL

$369 452 000

(in thousands $) TUITION FEES 75914 QUEBEC GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES 215035 GOVERNMENT OF CANADA SUBSIDIES 4.392 MISC. FEES AND OTHER INCOME 27099

SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY 7743

STUDENT SERVICES 13 664 ANCILLARY SERVICES 18232 RENTAL PROPERTIES 4828 UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 2309

NET INVESTMENT INCOME 236 TOTAL OPERATING REVENUE $369 452

RESEARCH FUND 2009

TOTAL

$32 523 000

(in thousands $)

QUEBEC GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES AST? GOVERNMENT OF CANADA SUBSIDIES 23 897

OTHER SUBSIDIES 22 GRANTS FROM OTHER SOURCES 3822 MISC. FEE AND OTHER INCOME 10

DONATIONS 195 TOTAL RESEARCH REVENUE $32 523

28

DESIGNATED FUND 2009

TOTAL

$13 155 000

(in thousands $)

QUEBEC GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES 288 GOVERNMENT OF CANADA SUBSIDIES 74 GRANTS FROM OTHER SOURCES 660 MISC. FEES AND OTHER INCOME 1222 DONATIONS 7 276 UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 2995 TOTAL DESIGNATED REVENUE $13 155

CAPITAL ASSETS FUND 2009

TOTAL

$30 143 000

(in thousands $)

QUEBEC GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES 29 410 GOVERNMENT OF CANADA SUBSIDIES 70

OTHER SUBSIDIES 75 MISC. FEES AND OTHER INCOME 88

DONATIONS 500 TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS REVENUE $30 143

EXPENDITURES 200810

OPERATING FUND 2009

TOTAL

$362 375 000

217 443

ACADEMIC SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 80 272 RESEARCH 8944 SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY 7 308 ANCILLARY SERVICES 17341 RENTAL PROPERTIES 3153 INTEREST ON BANK LOANS 2583 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES $362 375

RESEARCH FUND 2009

TOTAL

$30 870000

DESIGNATED FUND 2009

TOTAL

$11 378000

le 5 $)

3 036

TOTAL RESEARCH EXPENDITURES $30 870

UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION ENDOWED & RESTRICTED PROJECTS 8 342 TOTAL DESIGNATED EXPENDITURES $11 378 CAPITAL ASSETS FUND 2009 TOTAL

$50 257000 INTEREST ON BANK LOANS 1977 INTEREST ON LONG-TERM DEBT 14 309 AMORTIZATION 31777 TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS $50 257

EXPENDITURES

29

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